Brown Sugar Carrots.

This is the only way I like my carrots.

I’m a pretty picky eater, but I do like a few basic vegetables (cauliflower, broccoli, green beans, peas, corn, and carrots).  And this is by far the tastiest and easiest way I’ve found to eat carrots.

Easy three-ingredient carrots.

Easy three-ingredient carrots.

Here’s what you’ll need:

Ingredients.

Ingredients.

  • 1 lb carrots
  • 2 Tbsp butter
  • 1/3 cup brown sugar
Chop 'em up.

Chop ’em up.

Wash, peel, and chop the carrots as thick or thin as you like.

All good things involve butter.

All good things involve butter.

Melt the butter in a pan over medium heat.

Good things often involve sugar, too.

Good things often involve sugar, too.

Once the butter has melted, add your brown sugar.

By the way, I know I listed 1/3 cup brown sugar, but let’s be honest: it tastes better with more like 2/3 cup.  But that’s obviously not as healthy.  Of course, we’re dumping our carrots into butter and sugar, so how healthy are we trying to be, really?  But 1/3 cup is about the minimum amount of brown sugar that you need for these carrots to taste good, not just a little bit sweet.

Stir.

Stir.

Stir butter and brown sugar to mix.

Add carrots.

Add carrots.

Add chopped carrots; stir to coat.

Cover and simmer.

Cover and simmer.

Cover pan and simmer on low heat for at least twenty minutes, stirring occasionally.

Apparently, carrots leak.

Apparently, carrots leak.

By the way: In the beginning, two tablespoons of butter doesn’t look like enough for a pound of carrots to “simmer” in, but as they cook, the carrots leak their own juice.

Typically, once I cover the carrots and lower the heat, I move on to making the rest of dinner, and let the carrots simmer for however long it takes to get the rest ready.  I’m a big fan of overcooking vegetables, though, so you may not want them simmering for more than thirty minutes if you like to keep a little crunch.

All vegetables should taste like candy.

All vegetables should taste like candy.

And that’s it!  I’m a fan of easy.

And, for your cut-and-paste convenience:

Brown Sugar Carrots

  • 1 lb carrots
  • 2 Tbsp butter
  • ⅓ cup brown sugar
  1. Wash, peel, and chop carrots.
  2. Melt butter in pan over medium heat.
  3. Add brown sugar; stir to mix.
  4. Add chopped carrots; stir to coat.
  5. Cover pan and simmer over low heat at least 20 minutes.
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About ladyhawke41386

Full-time mom, full-time geek, part-time grown-up. View all posts by ladyhawke41386

6 responses to “Brown Sugar Carrots.

  • Vinny Grette

    Consider trying one new food 10 times during a month. That’s how I got to like strange things like lemon water, kimchi, sardines, avocado, even hot chilies. I’m discovering a whole new world of healthy eating and feeling just great for it all!

    • ladyhawke41386

      I have tried pushing myself to try new things many times in the past, but, unfortunately, it has not gone well! My tongue is super sensitive to things I don’t like (I can’t “hide” things in dishes like others can), and the list of things that “taste bad” to me is sadly long. 😦 I hate it! I would LOVE to be able to just order a hamburger at McDonald’s, or eat whatever kind of pizza gets ordered, or go to a Chinese buffet….being picky is inconvenient and, in social situations, embarassing, but it has been immensely discouraging to try my darnedest to change and come away with nothing new. 😦 I think I’ll be writing a post about picky eating at some point… I’m glad it’s worked for you, though! I’m sure for many people, trying new things can be a positive, palate-expanding experience–I truly wish I were one of them! 🙂

  • Vinny Grette

    Oh dear. This is bad news for my little guy who has a severe case of picky pi cky. He is super sensitive in many sensory areas and eating is especially bad. He also hates the wind on his skin, certain fabrics on his legs, getting his hair cut… the list goes on. I was hoping time would heal the food problem.. But maybe your experience tells me different. I imagine it’s a combination of strong taste and bothersome textures that turn you off? . .

    • ladyhawke41386

      He may yet grow out of it! Most kids do. However, there is a growing interest/awareness in what is being called “Selective Eating Disorder” (SED) in adults. You can read more about it here. If the foods he likes are mostly white or yellow–most common foods liked by people with SED are french fries, chicken nuggets, cheese pizza, and plain or buttered pasta–then he may be my brand of picky!

      Your comments about his other sensory issues prompt me to consider OCD, which can also be a significant factor in picky eating. I have a mild, undiagnosed (but definitely there) case of OCD, while my husband was been diagnosed with it as a child. As far as skin goes, I only care whether or not things feel “even” (if I touch something cold with one hand, I have to touch it with the other, too), but my husband struggles more with the feeling of certain things on his skin (he dislikes taking showers, for instance, though he still does it, because he doesn’t like the feeling of the water hitting his skin). But, while taste is primarily why I don’t like most foods I try, texture can be off-putting enough that I will avoid a food that feels “funny”.

      My best advice would be to keep urging him to try new things! But maybe some of those new things need to be 90% familiar and not entirely foreign. 🙂 Whether or not he grows out of his pickiness, catering to his tastes now will only serve to limit him more in the future. My parents made me eat what was served (for breakfast the next day, if I refused it at dinner!), and I think that was 100% the right approach, even though I still don’t like many of the things I had to eat Learning to have the discipline to swallow food you don’t care for will help him combat some of the negative social ramifications of being picky, if he doesn’t outgrow it; also. (The same goes for OCD–hubby and I have both learned to control some of our impulses so that most people don’t even know we’re struggling with something.) I am also more willing to try new things (or old things, made differently) than I think I would have been if my parents had just “let” me “be picky”. I think kids benefit from knowing what is expected of them, and being held to those expectations, and I know I personally benefited from that in this area.

      I’d be happy to answer any questions you have about my pickiness, if you think your little guy may share my tastes. It can be inconvenient, frustrating, and discouraging, but it doesn’t have to be debilitating! There is more to life than food. 🙂 Best of luck to you!

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