Tag Archives: cooking

Easy Zesty Green Beans.

See my latest recipe–delicious green beans with three ingredients and two minutes of prep time–here!

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The Chex Mix.

Anyone else counting down the days till Dragon*Con?  I got my “progress report” in the mail last week and drooled over it for half an hour.  Most excited for: Amy Acker!  She was scheduled for the Whedonverse and “Dollhouse” panels I attended last year, but had to cancel at the last minute due to illness.  Super excited to get to see her this year (*fingers crossed she remains in good health*)!  Biggest disappointment: NO WALKING DEAD.  I mean, NONE.  Last year, the stars of the show were scheduled for four panels over the weekend, one each day of the con, and even though I was a full season behind (damn you, Netflix), I decided to go despite the inevitable major spoilers.  Wil and I waited in line for nearly two hours for the first panel (on Friday); once everyone was in and seated, we got word that the cast was running late….and half an hour later, it was determined that they would not make it at all.  But it was early in the con….surely I could catch them later, right?  I had scheduling conflicts the following two days, so I tried again on Monday….to the same result.  Seriously, they made it to the two I couldn’t go to, and ditched the two panels I did–BOTH of them!  And this year, we’ve actually had cable, so I watched season four live, and I was so looking forward to being able to enjoy the panels without spoilers.  But NO ONE from WD is on the list in the progress report–and the show’s freaking filmed IN ATLANTA!!  GAH!  So. Disappointing.

Anyway….now that that’s out of the way, I’m cheating a little on this post.  I’m sharing an awesome recipe that isn’t mine, but it’s just too good not to urge you to try it….

You’ve probably seen it on Pinterest: “Better Than Sex” Chex Mix.

I think it really is...

I think it really is…

I did make a couple changes:

First, the recipe only calls for one cup of mini Reese’s cups.  Like that’s enough chocolate candy.  (Psh.)  I’ve made this three times, and added a cup of Rolos or mini Rolos every time, and let me tell you, it is sooo worth it.  I’ve considered adding M&Ms, too…or chunks of Heath bars…or Butterfingers….It’s a very customizeable recipe, so go ahead, add your own favorite candies!  (Also, I omit the sea salt.)

Second, I am utter crap at melting chocolate.  Even when I follow the directions to a T, I still end up burning it.  Doesn’t matter how often I stir it, it still burns.  So I use the double boiler method, without a real double boiler: I fill my smallest pot halfway with water, put it on medium heat, and balance my next-biggest pot on top of it with the chocolate dumped in.  It takes longer, I’m sure, but at least I don’t burn endless cups of chocolate chips that I’d rather eat than waste!

All in all, it’s kind of a royal pain to make, but it’s soooo goooooood that you’ll make it again anyway.

Is your mouth watering yet?

Is your mouth watering yet?

And, of course, I have to tell you about the first time I made this.  I’d stumbled upon the recipe on Pinterest and was looking for an excuse to make it shortly after we’d moved to Atlanta for my husband’s job.  He works for a missions organization, so, naturally, most of his coworkers are current or former missionaries and church planters.  And, naturally, my first opportunity to make this inappropriately-named dessert was for a work get-together….I kept my mouth shut as everyone dug in, but I’d made the mistake of mentioning to my husband what it was called, so after hearing a few exclamations of how good this stuff was, he turned to me and loudly asked, “What’s this called again?”  In a room full of missionaries.  Whom I barely knew.  I turned bright red and mumbled the name under my breath, but, alas, he did not let me off so easy, and made me repeat it for everyone to hear.  Fortunately, most Christians are actually not as uptight and prudish as you might think, and we all had a good laugh; the laughs continued as there were a couple concurrences on the truth of the name!

So, go make this Chex mix!  It’s amazing.  Some might say it’s even better than….never mind.


Corn Flake Chicken.

This is my very favorite chicken recipe.

Corn flake chicken.

Corn flake chicken.

I’m a picky eater.  I don’t actually like meat (of any kind).  But this chicken dish is all crunch and garlic powder, which overtakes the chicken taste, and I love it.

Here’s what you’ll need:

Ingredients.

Ingredients.

  • 1 lb thin-sliced chicken breasts
  • 2 cups corn flakes
  • 1/2 Tbsp garlic powder
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • 1/4 tsp pepper
  • 1 stick butter

Preheat the oven to 350.

CFC 02

Start by grinding up two cups of corn flakes.  My method is to dump them into a pie plate…

CFC 03

…and use a bowl (like a mortar and pestle) to grind them.

CFC 04

How finely you want to grind them is up to you; I try to avoid too much powder, but don’t leave any flakes whole.

CFC 05

Add garlic powder, salt, and pepper, to taste.  I like a lot of garlic powder.  (Like, a lot.  Picture clouds of pale powder puffing up as I toss the flakes to mix it all up.  So. Good.)

CFC 06

Mix the spices thoroughly into the corn flakes.

CFC 07

Melt the stick of butter in a bowl or shallow dish.  (I melt it in the bowl I used as a pestle for the corn flakes; I’m all about fewer dirty dishes!)

CFC 08

Next, set up your assembly line!

I intentionally use thin-sliced chicken for this recipe because I like the corn flake-to-chicken ratio to be as high as possible.  I’ve tried it with larger chicken breasts, and it just isn’t as good!  I’ve stopped buying thin-sliced for everything else, to save money, but this one is worth the higher price.

CFC 09

Dip (and submerge) each piece of chicken into the butter.

CFC 10

Coat it with the corn flake mixture.  (I roll it around a few times, then pile corn flakes on top of each side and press them into the chicken to get as much as possible to stick!)

CFC 11

Arrange the coated chicken in the baking dish.

CFC 12

Once they’re arranged, I sprinkle any remaining corn flakes over the whole dish, and pour a little bit of the leftover butter in for good measure (I love butter…).

CFC 13

Pop it in the oven, and bake at 350 for 25-30 minutes.

CFC 14

Done!

CFC 15

Delicious golden goodness…

And for your cut-and-paste convenience:

Corn Flake Chicken

  • 1 lb thin-sliced chicken breasts
  • 2 cups corn flakes, ground
  • ½ Tbsp garlic powder
  • ¼ tsp salt
  • ¼ tsp pepper
  • 1 stick butter, melted
  1. Preheat oven to 350.
  2. Mix corn flakes, garlic powder, salt, and pepper in shallow dish.
  3. Dip chicken in butter, then coat in corn flake mixture.
  4. Arrange coated chicken in baking dish.
  5. Bake 25-30 minutes.

Enjoy!

 

 


Chocolate peanut butter protein shake.

I have trouble finding ways to eat protein.  I hate the taste of pretty much all meat (I’ve come to tolerate chicken; I do like turkey bacon and chicken nuggets, however), nuts give me massive headaches, eating eggs regularly makes me feel sick….It’s difficult.

One of my favorite ways to get a little extra protein, though, is my chocolate peanut butter protein shake.

Chocolate peanut butter protein shake.

Chocolate peanut butter protein shake.

As with all other protein sources, my body rejects it and makes me feel sick if I make it too often, but boy is it yummy!  I would drink one of these every day if I could.  (I envy all you people who can, you know, eat food….)

Here’s what you’ll need:

Ingredients (not pictured: ice...because, you know, it melts).

Ingredients (not pictured: ice…because, you know, it melts).

  • Ice
  • 1 cup milk
  • 2 Tbsp Nesquik chocolate powder
  • 1 Tbsp peanut butter
  • 1 scoop protein powder, vanilla flavor
  • 1 Tbsp semi-sweet chocolate chips

And, of course, a decent blender: I love my Ninja.  It came with two single-serving cups, with blades that screw right onto the cups, and both blades and cups are dishwasher safe.  I swear, I would never use my blender if I had to wash a pitcher by hand every time!  This blender rocks.  (And no, no one paid me to say that.  I wish they would, though–it’d be easy money!)

Ice.

Ice.

Start with ice.  I fill my cup about halfway, but I like my shake thin enough to drink easily through a straw.  Add more ice if you want it a bit thicker.

Milk.

Milk.

Add one cup of milk.  (I usually use skim, but all I had on hand today was Kaylie’s whole milk.  Any kind will work.)

Chocolate powder.

Chocolate powder.

Add two tablespoons of Nesquik chocolate powder.  And don’t use that sugar-free crap; you can totally taste the difference with this stuff!  Don’t be one of those people.

Peanut butter.

Peanut butter.

Add approximately one tablespoon of peanut butter.  Peanut butter is one of those things that is a beast to measure out, of course, so I just eyeball it.

Protein powder.

Protein powder.

Add one scoop of protein powder.  I like this vanilla-flavored stuff from Sam’s Club.

Chocolate chips.

Chocolate chips.

Add one tablespoon of semi-sweet chocolate chips.  Or two tablespoons.  Or half a cup.  You know, sometimes it’s just one of those days when you need half a cup of chocolate chips.  Don’t judge.

Assembled.

Assembled.

Mine always ends up a little past the “max fill” line, but I’ve never had a problem.

Love my Ninja cups!

Love my Ninja cups!

The blade screws right onto the cup…very handy.

Ready to blend!

Ready to blend!

Screw onto blender…

Blended!

Blended!

…and blend!

IMG_9967

Done!

Chocolate peanut butter protein shake.

Chocolate peanut butter protein shake.

And for your cut-and-paste convenience:

Chocolate Peanut Butter Protein Shake (435 calories/31.5 grams protein)

  • Ice
  • 1 cup skim milk (90/8)
  • 2 Tbsp Nesquik chocolate powder (60/0)
  • 1 Tbsp peanut butter (95/3.5)
  • 1 scoop vanilla protein powder (120/20)
  • 1 Tbsp chocolate chips (70/0)

Combine all ingredients and blend thoroughly.

Enjoy!


Pesto Cream Pasta.

Confession: When it comes to cooking, I like to cheat.

There are some things that are better made from scratch (like pizza dough), but if I can take a shortcut by using something pre-made, or dried instead of fresh (I killed all my herb plants), I tend to do it.  It’s easier, and often cheaper, and those are things I value more highly than making a dish taste marginally better by sticking to a complicated or labor-intensive recipe.

I still remember the day I discovered The Pioneer Woman.  I was still in the “PIN ALL THE THINGS!!” phase of my Pinterest relationship, and I admit I went a little nuts.  I even went so far as to print off several pages of cut-and-paste recipes gleaned from her website, some of which I managed to maintain the momentum to actually try within the week.  One of those was her Pasta with Pesto Cream Sauce.

Pesto Cream Pasta.

Pesto Cream Pasta.

I love pasta alfredo, but my hubby finds it too plain, so the pesto in this dish gives it that extra kick of flavor.

I’m sure it’s better her way.  But making pesto from scratch?  Fresh basil is pricey, and homegrown, in my house, is, well, dead.  (Seriously.  Black thumb here.)  And pine nuts?  I think that was the deciding factor in going with jarred pesto instead of attempting to make it myself, because I have no idea what aisle the pine nuts are in at the grocery store.  (And I really am lazy enough for that to scare me away.)  So I cheated.

I’m glad I did.  Simpler works better for me, and this dish is still really good.

Here’s what you’ll need:

Ingredients.

Ingredients.

  • 8-12 oz pasta (we like veggie pasta)
  • 2 Tbsp butter
  • 1/2 cup heavy cream
  • 1/2 cup grated parmesan
  • 1 Tbsp jarred pesto

IMG_9238

Cook pasta according to package directions.  (I went with about 8 0z this night–for me, the amount depends on whether this is the main course or a side.)

Most things that start with butter and heavy cream end well.

Most things that start with butter and heavy cream end well.

While the pasta cooks, heat the butter and heavy cream over medium-low heat.

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(I get so bored waiting for things to melt or boil.  Not a patient person.)

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Once the butter has melted, add the pesto and parmesan.

IMG_9242

Stir to mix.

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When the pasta’s done…

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…drain it.

You know how when you make a sauce, and then pour it over something, there’s always quite a bit remaining, clinging to the sides and bottom of the saucepan and refusing to drip out at a reasonable rate?  (Again, not a patient person.)  There are two ways around this: either dump the pasta into the sauce (instead of the sauce onto the pasta), or…

IMG_9252

Dump two-thirds of the pasta back into the pot it cooked in (or into a serving dish), and pour the sauce over it.  Dump the remaining third of pasta into the sauce pot, stir to coat…

IMG_9255

…add it to the rest of the pasta and sauce.   No sauce wasted!

Pouring the pasta into the sauce is simpler, but I always end up cooking the pasta in the bigger saucepan and the sauce in the smaller one, and I’ve learned the messy way that there is not room to stir the pasta and sauce in the small one.

IMG_9256

And there you go!  Easy pasta, but not alfredo-boring.  I love it!

And for your cut-and-paste convenience:

Pasta with Pesto Cream Sauce

  • 8-12 oz pasta
  • 2 Tbsp butter
  • ½ cup heavy cream
  • ½ cup grated parmesan
  • 1 Tbsp jarred pesto
  1. Cook pasta according to package directions; drain.
  2. Heat cream and butter in small saucepan over medium-low heat.
  3. Add pesto and parmesan; stir.
  4. Toss pasta in pesto cream sauce.

Enjoy!  (And if you have time to try it the “real” way, I’d love to hear from you how they compare!)

 


Brown Sugar Carrots.

This is the only way I like my carrots.

I’m a pretty picky eater, but I do like a few basic vegetables (cauliflower, broccoli, green beans, peas, corn, and carrots).  And this is by far the tastiest and easiest way I’ve found to eat carrots.

Easy three-ingredient carrots.

Easy three-ingredient carrots.

Here’s what you’ll need:

Ingredients.

Ingredients.

  • 1 lb carrots
  • 2 Tbsp butter
  • 1/3 cup brown sugar
Chop 'em up.

Chop ’em up.

Wash, peel, and chop the carrots as thick or thin as you like.

All good things involve butter.

All good things involve butter.

Melt the butter in a pan over medium heat.

Good things often involve sugar, too.

Good things often involve sugar, too.

Once the butter has melted, add your brown sugar.

By the way, I know I listed 1/3 cup brown sugar, but let’s be honest: it tastes better with more like 2/3 cup.  But that’s obviously not as healthy.  Of course, we’re dumping our carrots into butter and sugar, so how healthy are we trying to be, really?  But 1/3 cup is about the minimum amount of brown sugar that you need for these carrots to taste good, not just a little bit sweet.

Stir.

Stir.

Stir butter and brown sugar to mix.

Add carrots.

Add carrots.

Add chopped carrots; stir to coat.

Cover and simmer.

Cover and simmer.

Cover pan and simmer on low heat for at least twenty minutes, stirring occasionally.

Apparently, carrots leak.

Apparently, carrots leak.

By the way: In the beginning, two tablespoons of butter doesn’t look like enough for a pound of carrots to “simmer” in, but as they cook, the carrots leak their own juice.

Typically, once I cover the carrots and lower the heat, I move on to making the rest of dinner, and let the carrots simmer for however long it takes to get the rest ready.  I’m a big fan of overcooking vegetables, though, so you may not want them simmering for more than thirty minutes if you like to keep a little crunch.

All vegetables should taste like candy.

All vegetables should taste like candy.

And that’s it!  I’m a fan of easy.

And, for your cut-and-paste convenience:

Brown Sugar Carrots

  • 1 lb carrots
  • 2 Tbsp butter
  • ⅓ cup brown sugar
  1. Wash, peel, and chop carrots.
  2. Melt butter in pan over medium heat.
  3. Add brown sugar; stir to mix.
  4. Add chopped carrots; stir to coat.
  5. Cover pan and simmer over low heat at least 20 minutes.

Soft Pretzels.

Sorry for the lack of posts lately.  In addition to still dealing with the aftermath of a burst pipe in our basement laundry room last month, I was so sick last week that my husband had to take time off work to help with the kids and cart me to the doctor, and then everyone came down with a nasty cold, aaaaaaand Wil is teething.

But the new washer and dryer are here (in our partially gutted with-a-hole-in-the-wall laundry room), I’m feeling better, and one of Wil’s teeth broke through, so, in celebration:

Homemade soft pretzel sticks.

Homemade soft pretzel sticks.

A few years ago, I decided to try my hand at homemade pasta.  Because I love pasta.  I’d just bought this really great pasta cookbook, and it had a section on how to make your own pasta.  I’d never done it before…..and I don’t think I’ll ever do it again.  The whole attempt was a miserable, lumpy, spongey failure.  So I ended up with about four and a half pounds of leftover bread flour, and no idea what to do with it, as all of my familiar recipes called for standard flour.

I don’t remember how the idea of soft pretzels occurred to me, but I managed to find three or four pretzel recipes that called for bread flour.  I no longer have the recipes I started with, but I took the basics and what I liked from each and put together this recipe, which I love.

Ingredients.

Ingredients.

You’ll need:

For the dough:

  • 1 1/2 cups warm water
  • 1 package active dry yeast
  • 2 Tbsp brown sugar
  • 1 1/8 tsp salt
  • 1 cup bread flour
  • 3 cups regular flour

For the soda bath:

  • 2 cups warm water
  • 2 Tbsp baking soda

For topping:

  • 4 Tbsp butter & coarse salt, to taste, OR
  • 1 stick butter & cinnamon/sugar mixture, to taste

I didn’t have my stand mixer back when I first started making these.  I am utter crap at making dough by hand, but these pretzels were so good the first time that I made them again, and again, and again.  But now that I have my stand mixer, which I LOVE, it is so much easier!  I highly recommend getting a KitchenAid stand mixer if you don’t have one already…..

Water, yeast, brown sugar, & salt.

Water, yeast, brown sugar, & salt.

Add yeast to warm water in your mixing bowl, stirring to dissolve; then stir in the brown sugar and salt.

Add flours.

Add flours.

Add both types of flour.

My KitchenAid Artisan at work.

My KitchenAid Artisan at work.

Let your mixer do the work.  (Or knead dough by hand on floured surface until smooth and elastic.)

So. Much. Easier, than by hand.

So. Much. Easier, than by hand.

(I love my mixer.)

Dough.

Dough.

Doesn’t look like much yet.

Cover and let rise.

Cover and let rise.

Cover dough and let it rise 30-60 minutes.

It's a little bigger now.

It’s a little bigger now.

I typically let mine rise about 45 minutes by the time I’m done preparing the soda bath.

Soda bath.

Soda bath.

Add baking soda to warm water in a large bowl, stirring to dissolve.

Time to play with dough!

Time to play with dough!

Pinch off a chunk of dough.

.....Not a pretzel shape.

…..Not a pretzel shape.

I figured out that first time I tried this that I cannot make a pretzel shape.  Like, truly.  I just can’t.  My ropes weren’t long enough, or skinny enough, and they kept ripping, and my pretzels just looked like lumps.  I mean, they weren’t even knots.  Just weird ropey lumps.  So I gave up and now I just make pretzel sticks.

So, shape the dough into sticks.  (Or, you know, pretzels.  You probably won’t suck as bad as I did.)

Take a bath.

Take a bath.

Dunk shaped dough in the soda bath, shaking off excess water.

Apparently I also suck at making sticks of uniform size and length.

Apparently I also suck at making sticks of uniform size and length.

Arrange sticks/pretzels on a greased cookie sheet (or parchment paper, unless you live in an aparment with a crappy oven that burns anything and everything at every available opportunity and sets the smoke alarm off during naptime–have I mentioned how much I love the oven we bought when we moved?).

They're just unique, okay?  If they were all the same size, it'd be boring.

They’re just unique, okay? If they were all the same size, it’d be boring.

Let the shaped dough rise another 15-20 minutes, while your oven preheats to 450.

Baking time!

Baking time!

Bake at 450 for 8-10 minutes, or until golden.

Golden.

Golden.

Done baking!

Butter makes all things better, so don't be stingy.

Butter makes all things better, so don’t be stingy.

Brush liberally with melted butter.

Confession: I don't understand any kind of pretzel that isn't salted.

Confession: I don’t understand any kind of pretzel that isn’t salted.

Top with coarse salt.  (I’ve never had to buy pretzel salt–I used to keep frozen soft pretzels stocked, and every once in a while I’ll buy and make one of those Auntie Anne’s box mixes, and I’ve never used anywhere close to all of the salt provided in either case, so I have several remaining unopened bags of pretzel salt floating around my baking cabinet.)

Lookin' gooooood.

Lookin’ gooooood.

Salted pretzels!

One time, I did make half the batch cinnamon-sugar instead of salted.  For that, dip the baked pretzels into melted butter, then dip them into your cinnamon-sugar mixture.  But I just can’t get behind anything but the classic goodness of buttery salted pretzels….

Full batch.

Full batch.

Makes about 18 pretzel sticks.  Obviously depends on shape and size.

I'm drooling right now.

I’m drooling right now.

Best eaten while warm.

I can't tell if they look less weird or more weird on a plate.  I think I need to work on my stick-shaping skills, guys.

I can’t tell if they look less weird or more weird on a plate. I think I need to work on my stick-shaping skills, guys.

They’re not quite as good reheated.  All the same, I’m gonna wrap this up so I can go reheat a few pretzel sticks for dinner.

Sooooo. Goooooood.

Sooooo. Goooooood.

For your cut-and-paste convenience:

Soft Pretzels

Dough:

  • 1½ cups warm water
  • 1 package active dry yeast
  • 2 Tbsp brown sugar
  • 1⅛ tsp salt
  • 1 cup bread flour
  • 3 cups regular flour

Soda bath:

  • 2 cups warm water
  • 2 Tbsp baking soda

Toppings:

  • 4 Tbsp butter (unsalted) & coarse salt, to taste
  • 1 stick butter (unsalted) & cinnamon/sugar mixture, to taste
  1. In mixing bowl, dissolve yeast in warm water; stir.
  2. Add brown sugar and salt to water; stir to dissolve.
  3. Add flours to mixture; knead dough on floured surface until smooth and elastic.
  4. Cover dough and let rise 30-60 minutes.
  5. Prepare soda bath, combining water and baking soda in large bowl.  Stir often.
  6. After dough has risen, pinch off chunks of dough to roll into ropes and shape.  Dip shaped pretzel in soda bath and place on parchment paper or greased cookie sheet.  Let rise 15-20 minutes.
  7. Bake at 450 for 8-10 minutes or until golden.
  8. To top, either brush with butter and sprinkle with salt, or dip into butter and dip into cinnamon/sugar mixture.

Enjoy!

 

 

 

 


Cheesy Chicken Packets.

Cheesy Chicken Packets

Cheesy Chicken Packets

This is one of my all-time favorite go-to recipes.  We typically eat it at least once a week.  It’s quick and easy, and I always have all the ingredients stocked except for the crescent rolls.

You’ve probably seen similar versions on Pinterest and elsewhere.  This one is my own combination of primarily this version and a friend’s cheesy chicken casserole recipe.  I haven’t tried any other versions, but this idea is very customizable, so play around with it!

Ingredients

Here’s what you’ll need:

  • 1 package crescent rolls
  • 5-6 oz cooked chicken (you can buy a 5 oz can, or split a 12.5 oz can into two servings like I do)
  • 2/3 cup shredded cheddar
  • 1 Tbsp milk
  • 1 Tbsp butter, melted
  • Italian bread crumbs, to taste

Preheat your oven to 350.

Cheesy Chicken Packets 03

Drain the can of cooked chicken (and divide into two portions, if using a large can).  Dump the chicken into a medium-sized bowl.

Cheesy Chicken Packets 04

I usually shred the chicken with my fingers, but you can leave it in larger chunks if you prefer.  I don’t really like the taste of meat, so my goal is to help that chicken hide in all the cheese.

Cheesy Chicken Packets 05

Add the cheddar and the milk to the bowl of chicken.  (That’s a 1/2 tablespoon pictured, because all my tablespoons seem to have disappeared from my kitchen.  Drat.  But use a whole tablespoon.)

Cheesy Chicken Packets 06

Mix well.

Cheesy Chicken Packets 07

Open the package of crescent rolls and unroll them into four rectangles; lay them flat on a greased cookie sheet.  Press diagonal seams together to prevent gaps.

(If you are doubling the recipe or using a smaller cookie sheet, you could alternatively form each packet one by one on a plate and arrange them on the cookie sheet once they’re filled and sealed.)

Cheesy Chicken Packets 08

Spoon gobs of cheesy chicken goodness onto one half of each rectangle.

Cheesy Chicken Packets 09

Leave room around the edges of each pile.

Cheesy Chicken Packets 10

Fold each rectangle over the filling and press the edges together to seal it.  Use your fingers to flatten each packet a little bit as you go.

Cheesy Chicken Packets 11

All sealed shut!  I like to rearrange mine to line up all pretty, but that’s just me.

Cheesy Chicken Packets 12

Microwave the butter in a small bowl to melt it.

Cheesy Chicken Packets 13

Like so.

Cheesy Chicken Packets 14

Brush each packet thoroughly with the melted butter.

Cheesy Chicken Packets 15

Sprinkle each packet liberally with bread crumbs.  I recommend using lots.

Cheesy Chicken Packets 16

Ready to bake!

Cheesy Chicken Packets 17

Bake at 350 for 20-25 minutes, or until the packets are golden-brown.

Cheesy Chicken Packets 18

Like so.

Cheesy Chicken Packets 19

Mmmm!  Ready to eat!

Cheesy Chicken Packets 20

Enjoy!  I’d love to hear your variations on the packet idea!

Here’s the recipe, for your cut-and-paste convenience:

Cheesy Chicken Packets

  • 1 package crescent rolls
  • 1 can (5 oz) cooked chicken (or half of a 12.5 oz can)
  • 2/3 cup shredded cheddar
  • 1 Tbsp milk
  • 1 Tbsp butter, melted
  • Italian bread crumbs, to taste
  1. Preheat oven to 350.
  2. Unroll crescent rolls and divide into four rectangles on cookie sheet.  Press diagonal seams together.
  3. In bowl, mix chicken (pulled into smaller pieces, if desired), cheddar, and milk.
  4. Spoon chicken mixture onto one half of each rectangle.  Fold rectangle in half to cover chicken mixture and press edges to seal shut.
  5. Brush packets with butter and coat liberally with bread crumbs.
  6. Bake 20-25 minutes (or until golden brown).